<group>

The purpose of the <group> tag is solely to allow for the further nesting of additional <text> tags, one for each component of the collection being encoded.

Examples:

1. The 'Excerpta de libris Romanorum et Francorum', a simple collection, with no subordinate components:

  • <text>
    • <body>
      • ... [<div> tags for individual canons] ...
    • </body>
  • </text>

This collection is not a composite text: there are no major textual divisions beyond that of individual canons. Therefore, only one <text> tag is needed, and there is no need to use <group>.

2. The 'Collectio Dacheriana', a composite collection divided into four subordinate components ("preface", "book"):

  • <text> [this "text" tag represents the collection itself]
    • <group>
      • <text type="preface"> [this "text" tag represents the first textual component]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • <text type="book" n="1"> [the second component of the collection, Book I]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • <text type="book" n="2"> [the third component of the collection, Book II]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • <text type="book" n="3"> [the fourth component of the collection, Book III]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
    • </group>
  • </text>

This collection consists of three books and a lengthy preface, each of which must be encoded within a separate <text> tag. Each of these <text> tags must be nested within a <group> tag, which is itself nested within the principal <text> tag which designates the collection as a whole. Note: the CCL numbers the <text> components which represent divison into books by giving these tags the attribute n="#" where # equals the number of the book. We do not number prefaces, except in rare occasions where there are more than one in a sequence.

3. The ‘Collectio Dionysio-Hadriana’, a composite collection, with many subordinate components ("preface", "creed", "council" and "decretal"):

  • <text> [this tag represents the collection itself]
    • <group>
      • <text type="preface"> [this tag represents the first textual component]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • <text type="council" n="1"> [the second textual component of the collection]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • <text type="preface"> [the third textual component of the collection]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • <text type="council" n="2"> [the fourth textual component of the collection]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • ...
      • <text type="council" n="13"> [the fifteenth textual component of the collection]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • <text type="decretal" n="1"> [the sixteenth textual component of the collection]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • <text type="decretal" n="2"> [the seventeenth textual component of the collection]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • ...
    • </group>
  • </text>

Here many subordinate components of different types are nested within a <group> tag. Notice that we number components of the same type that occur in sequence using the @n="#" attribute.

When encoding an entire manuscript which contains all three of the above collections, that is the the ‘Excerpta de libris Francorum et Romanorum’, the ‘Collectio Dionysio-Hadriana’ and the ‘Collectio Dacheriana’, each collection would be viewed as a subordinate component of a larger unitary entity, that is of the codex itself. The XML hierarchy would incorporate the structures outlined in the examples above; but an additional level of <text> and <group> would be necessary to reflect the arrangement of the collections within the codex, which is now the principal textual entity (the codex itself is here conceived of as an anthology of canon law collections). Our imaginary composite codex would take the following structure:

  • <text> [this tag represents the codex itself]
    • <group>
      • <text n="1"> [the first collection within the codex (‘ExLibFrancRom’)]
        • <body> ... </body>
      • </text>
      • <text n="2"> [the second collection (‘Dacheriana’)]
        • <group>
          • <text type="preface"> [the first textual component of this collection]
            • <body> ... </body>
          • </text>
          • <text type="book" n="1"> [the second textual component of this collection]
            • <body> ... </body>
          • </text>
          • <text type="book" n="2">
            • <body> ... </body>
          • </text>
          • <text type="book" n="3">
            • <body> ... </body>
          • </text>
        • </group>
      • <text n="3"> [the third collection (‘Dionysio-Hadriana’)]
        • <group>
          • <text type="preface"> [the first textual component of this collection]
            • <body> ... </body>
          • </text>
          • <text type="council" n="1"> [the second textual component of the collection]
            • <body> ... </body>
          • </text>
          • ...
          • <text type="decretal" n="1">
            • <body> ... </body>
          • </text>
          • ...
        • </group>
      • </text>
    • </group>
  • </text>

In this structure, the codex itself is treated as a composite text with multiple subordinate components. The codex is represented with its own <text> tag, which stands at the top of the structural hierarchy; a <group> tag is nested within it. Within this <group> tag are nested the three <text> tags which represent the three collections in the manuscript. However, since two of the three collections are themelves composite texts (namely the ‘Dacheriana’ and the ‘Dionysio-Hadriana’), these <text> tags each require the child tag <group>; within this <group> tag are nested the various <text> tags which make up the components of each collections (‘book’, ‘council’, etc.). When there are multiple collections within the same codex, the CCL numbers the corresponding <text> tags using the attribute n="#", where # is the position (expressed numerically) the collection takes in the codex (so, n="1" for the first collection, n="2" for the second, and so on).